Home » Tips » My Dog’s Ears Are Cold (Why & What To Do About It)

My Dog’s Ears Are Cold (Why & What To Do About It)

why are my dogs ears cold

Dog Club Life is reader-supported. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more

Is your dog’s ears cold? Maybe it’s a sign that something is wrong.

But how do you know what your dog needs when their ears are cold? Do they just need some extra love and attention, or is time to seek veterinary care?

Dogs’ ears can get cold for a variety of reasons. Sometimes there may be an underlying medical condition, while other times it could be due to environmental factors. If your dog’s ears are cold, it is important to pay attention to other signs and symptoms they are experiencing. This will help you determine whether or not they need to see a vet.

There are a few reasons why your dog’s ears might be cold:

8 Reasons Why Your Dog’s Ears Are Cold

Your Dog’s Sick

One of the most common reasons for cold ears in dogs is an underlying illness. If your dog has a cold or other respiratory infection, their body temperature may be lower than normal. This can cause their ears to feel cold to the touch.

In addition to cold ears, other signs that your dog may be sick include:

  • Sneezing and runny nose
  • Loss of appetite
  • Lethargy and fatigue

If you notice any of these symptoms in your dog, it is important to take them to the vet right away to get a diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

Hypovolemic Shock

Another possible cause of cold ears in dogs is hypovolemic shock. This is a condition where there is an extreme loss of blood or fluid from the body, which can cause the body’s temperature to drop. In addition to cold ears, other symptoms of hypovolemic shock in dogs include:

  • Very low blood pressure
  • Hyperventilation
  • Hemorrhage
  • Respiratory failure
  • Poor pulse
  • Sever weakness

If you suspect that your dog may be suffering from hypovolemic shock, it is important to seek emergency veterinary care right away.

Cold Weather

If the weather is cold, your dog’s ears may feel cold to the touch. This is because their body temperature may be lower than normal. In addition to cold ears, other signs that your dog may be too cold include:

  • Shivering
  • Hunching over
  • Lifting their paws off the ground

If you think your dog may be cold, it is important to take them inside or put a coat on them to help keep them warm.

Other Environmental Factors

There are also other environmental factors that can cause your dog’s ears to feel cold. Some of these include:

  • Exposure to wind or rain
  • Poor insulation in their living environment (e.g., drafty house, cold garage)
  • Humidity

If you think environmental factors may be causing your dog’s ears to feel cold, it is important to take steps to protect them from the elements. This may include putting a coat on them when they go outside or making sure their living area is well-insulated.

Frostbite

If you suspect that your dog’s cold ears are due to exposure to the elements, it is important to bring them inside and warm them up gradually. You should also contact your veterinarian to check for signs of frostbite.

Hypothermia

Hypothermia is another possible cause of cold ears in dogs. This occurs when your dog’s body temperature drops to dangerously low levels, and it can be life-threatening if left untreated. Some common symptoms of hypothermia include:

  • Rapid breathing
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Paleness
  • Depression
  • Dilated pupils
  • Sluggishness and delayed reflexes
  • Increased heart rate

If you think your dog may be suffering from hypothermia, it is important to seek emergency veterinary care right away.

Parvo Infection

Parvo is a serious, potentially life-threatening illness that can cause cold ears in dogs. Some common symptoms of parvo infection include:

  • Fever
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Lethargy and fatigue
  • Loss of appetite
  • Dehydration

If you think your dog has parvo, it is crucial to get them to the vet right away for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Age, Breed & Size

There are certain factors that can increase your dog’s risk of developing cold ears. These include:

  • Age – Older dogs may be more prone to cold ears due to changes in their body or medications they are taking.
  • Breed – Some dog breeds are more susceptible to environmental conditions that can cause a drop in body temperature.
  • Size – Large dogs may be more likely to experience cold ears due to their larger body size and increased surface area.

Circulatory Function

Finally, another possible cause of cold ears in dogs is circulatory function. Circulation issues can occur for a variety of reasons, including heart conditions, anemia, and blood loss. If your dog has poor circulation, their body may not be able to circulate warmth to their extremities, including their ears.

What To Do If Your Dog’s Ears Are Cold

If you notice that your dog’s ears are cold, it is important to take their temperature. A normal dog’s ear temperature should be between 100 and 102 degrees Fahrenheit. If your dog’s ears are significantly lower than this, it is important to take them to the vet right away for a check-up.

There are also a few things you can do at home to help warm up your dog’s cold ears, including:

  • Putting a coat on them
  • Putting them in a warm room or car
  • Applying a warm, wet cloth to their ears
  • Giving them a warm bath

If you are concerned about your dog’s cold ears, it is always best to consult with your veterinarian for guidance on how to best care for your pet.

Conclusion

Regardless of the cause, if your dog’s ears are cold, it is important to pay attention to other signs and symptoms they are experiencing. This will help you determine whether or not they need to see a vet.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Scroll to Top